ny times again downing ADD ADHD — ADD Tip o the DAY 556

More ADD ADHD Controversy

I’m slogging through the November 2 New York Times article, “A Natural Fix for ADHD”. It’s not as nasty as the recent series of articles they ran; it’s more subtle. I’m having to take it in small chunks and trying to grasp it as I go. Oh my.

The author, “Richard A. Friedman, MD is Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Director of the Psychopharmacology Clinic. He specializes in Anxiety and Mood Disorders and has expertise in Psycho-Pharmacology and Refractory Depression.” at Weill Cornell Medical College.

And I’m just a poor old country boy who has ADD ADHD. How can I question this expert?

The Expert

He asks, “– whether something that affects so many people can really be a disease.”             I don’t know. Cancer affects a lot of people. If the majority of people are obese, does that make obesity “normal”?

He says, “that people with ADHD are actually hardwired for novelty – seeking”. Is he implying that that makes it not a disease or not a problem?

“… People with ADHD may not have a disease, so much as a set of behavioral traits that don’t match the expectations of our contemporary culture.” Would that be true of people who compulsively shoplift or gamble or hoard or have to check that the doors are locked exactly 9 times before they leave, or of people with schizophrenia, or possibly of people with severe depression, which apparently is his specialty?

I’m just getting started. But wait till you hear what his “natural fix” is!

And the question of how Ritalin, Adderall, amphetamines, and the other stimulants work.

Next time.

doug

The Relevant Links

Dr. Friedman‘s article

Dr. Mason’s comment on Dr. Friedman’s article

how ritalin works

on Dr. Friedman himself, note that his listed areas of expertise do not include ADD ADHD

ADD,ADHD,adult ADD,adult ADHD,attention deficit,controversies, ADHD controversies,Ritalin,Adderall,stimulants,amphetamines,ADHD medication for children,ADD children and medicine.

Let’s all just stay calm!

 

Advertisements

About doug with ADHD

I am a psychiatric physician. I learned I have ADHD at age 64, and then wrote two ADHD books for adults, focusing on strategies for making your life better. Your Life Can Be Better; strategies for adults with ADD/ADHD available at amazon.com, or smashwords.com (for e books) Living Daily With Adult ADD or ADHD: 365 Tips O the Day ( e-book). This is one tip at a time, one page at a time, at your own pace. It's meant to last a year. As a child, I was a bully. Then there was a transformation. Now I am committed to helping people instead abusing them. The Bully was published in January, 2016. It's in print or e book, on Amazon.
This entry was posted in add, ADD problems or symptoms, adhd, ADHD problems, controversies, dysfunctions, educate yourself, medication, science, stimulants and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to ny times again downing ADD ADHD — ADD Tip o the DAY 556

  1. adderollin says:

    Long time follower and reader. The negativity of Adderall has hit my new doctor. Had to change docs because my old one was reassigned out of state, and my new one has decided I should try Welbutrin. As of the last 3 days, definitely not my flavor… Just isn’t doing it. Ive noticed increasingly negative remarks concerning Adderall. What’s your take on it and could you give me other ideas to propose to my doctor?

    Liked by 1 person

    • adder- thank you for reading and following.
      in my opinion, adderall is a fine medicine, sometimes for some people. nothing wrong with it. i never prescribed it, because I did not want people coming to my office trying to get it, and I would have to decide if they were abusers are not, and then later, I didn’t prescribe it, because I have no experience with it.
      Some people do well with welbutrin, you might need to slowly raise the dose and see if you can get benefits without side effects.
      An alternative might be Ritalin or Concerta or Vyvanse or the Daytrana patch ( Ritalin ina patch)
      good luck.
      Doug

      Like

      • adderollin says:

        Thanks for the response. Tried Welbutrin for a few days and it made me super aggressive and down right lack any focus. Concerta had similar effects. So far Adderall has been what has worked, and I really take it on an as needed basis (30mg XR, 10 IR) which comes out to maybe 3-4x a week. Just getting frustrated because I believe it works for me, and the negativity associated with it seems to have my doctor searching for a new treatment plan. Have never experienced the negative side effects with it either, took it as a child for a couple years and after 15 years I got back on it.
        I suppose the search continues. Thanks again.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. If he had ADD/ADHD, he’d be singing a different tune!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Katy Rollins says:

    Dr. Friedman’s opinion piece was indeed, yet another unvetted, sloppy offering by the NYT. And you gotta live how they silently rationalize its inclusion by…running it as an opinion piece. My question is: How is it appropriate to run opinion pieces on medical condition. This stuff has gotten so old.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Scott Marckx says:

    Thanks Doug,
    It is interesting that, for not believing ADHD is a real disease, he is still charging money to patients to treat it. Also he is quoting scientific articles that explain the differences between people with and without ADHD. That said, I do consider my own ADD an advantage in a lot of situations, just not in the getting important things done department. I’m still working on using exercise, Omega 3s, and strategies, without drugs to manage my own ADD, but I can see how drugs can really help people with ADHD.
    Your book and Blog have been especially helpful with the strategies. I’m listening to “Moonwalking With Einstein” by Josh Foer right now about memory techniques and it really resonates with ADD issues like how to make something grab your attention so it can become memorable, even to-do lists! Some of it reminds me of the visualization techniques in another ADHD book that was helpful to me, but the ideas in Foer’s book take it to a whole new level. I would be curious what you think about Foer’s book and how those memorization techniques might apply to ADHD?
    All the best,
    Scott

    Like

    • Scott – good point! And good for you about the medicines, they work for some people, and not for others, and some of us need them and some of us don’t. Exercise, omega-3, and strategies are all good.
      I’m always delighted to hear that the book and blog it been helpful, thank you for the feedback and as always, thank you for commenting.
      I will be interested in checking out the foer book . If I don’t get stuck in procrastinating and the whirlwind of moving.
      Doug

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s